The end peaks

Wildland firefighters prepare for a jaunt back to the scene of the fire to put it out.

Wildland firefighters prepare for a jaunt back to the scene of the fire to put it out.

The night was late but the morning started early. At 8am I walked to the gas station for coffee and talked with a few people along the way who were going fishing. I eventually made it back to my place and watched, “I hope they serve beer in hell.” My review: it is pretty good. Although part demeaning to our women, it is funny and a satire too. Just as I was taking a look at the outtakes I heard a knock on the door and saw a woman in the window. “There’s a bear just outside here.” I immediately grabbed the radio to tell someone on duty that we needed to move this bear away from the residential areas. Nobody responded so I threw on some boots, without socks which was foolish. With bear spray in hand and radio in the other I spotted the bear about 10 meters away so I started to clap and yell, “Get away from my house bear. Go now!” The bear started to move up the hill and I pursued behind making noise along the way. John Kerr, the ranger who I work with on bears, radioed in and provided support from the station. The bear did not care about me being close and I felt like using my spray because I did not want this bear hanging out any longer in the area because eventually it would find human food and will face the barrel end of several shotgun bursts. After chasing the bear into the thick woods up a hill, John Kerr met me over by the Roosevelt employee cabins of Zanterra Hotels. He gave me a ride back to my place and I reshowered for the day. Work started normal chasing bears away from the road and hiking for lost hikers. When it calmed down a bit I began to shuttle Ranger Scott Sabo to Mammoth, the next area about 45 minutes away, to pick up oxygen tanks and his vehicle. Before we left the Tower area we heard over the radio that there was a motorcycle accident. So I 180ed the HHR and drove as fast as I could back to the Ranger Station to get the ambulance. Before we reached the Station I spotted smoke about a mile into the tree line. Sabo radioed the communication center and we decided to go to the scene and assess the fire or even put it out. We hiked as far as we could before reaching the Lamar River. Once there we saw the helicopter begin to drop many gallons of water upon the fire so we did not have to ford the river and instead went to find a place for the helicopter to land and refill gas. As we were meeting the wildland firefighters, the helicopter came in fast to a smooth landing. I talked for a while with the pilot and learned that the helicopter had been in service since 1982. We joked around while it was refueled and I advised some fisherman to stay in their vehicle with the windows closed so the dust from the propellers would not disturb them. Two of the fishermen were from Belfast, Northern Ireland. Once the helicopter cleared the scene and the fire out, I returned to the Station to plan out the next night when my cousin Patrick Coyne would be visiting. The plan is to spend the night in Jackson Hole and then haul back to the Station for a noon shift, at least I hope if Ranger Claire Stout switches shifts with me. The rest of the day was easy going. I picked up Ranger John Murray from the backcountry. They had to kill a black bear because it fed upon abandoned human food from a campsite with a bunch of idiots who did not use common sense. We drove around some buffalo on the way back and I decided to call it a day and pour a drink and hopefully find some dinner.

It is up for debate whether or not the fire should have been put out. The lodgepole pine needs heat.

It is up for debate whether or not the fire should have been put out. The lodgepole pine needs heat.

Instead they brought in the big guys and they took care of it. Cool dudes

Instead they brought in the big guys and they took care of it. Cool dudes

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